Andrew Rolfe Helps Raise Over £600,000 to Help Disadvantaged African Children

In a fundraiser gala recently held in London, Andrew Rolfe, the chairman of the Ubuntu fund helped raise £603,000 to support disadvantaged children in Africa. About 300 guests were in attendance at the London gala where Andrew Rolfe, the chairman, opened the ceremony. There were several speakers, including some of the fund’s beneficiaries who shared their life stories with the guests. The auction was presided over by British auctioneer Charlie Ross.

Ubuntu Fund’s founder and CEO ended the event with a brief speech. He stressed the importance of providing children with all they need when growing up. Some of this money will be directed towards improving pediatric hospitals associated with Ubuntu education fund’s Port Elizabeth campus and some towards the improvement of the campus itself.

How the Ubuntu education fund is used

The Ubuntu education fund was established in 1999 to provide assistance in the form of education to disadvantaged children in Africa. The charity organization later realized there were other big problems in Africa, such as hunger and HIV. As a result, the organization expanded its operations to provide assistance with issues such as home stability, nutrition, and health on top of helping these kids reach their dreams through education. At the moment, the organization uses its resources to provide assistance to over 400,000 thousand children in sub-Saharan Africa.

About Andrew Rolfe

Andrew Rolfe attended his undergraduate studies at Oxford University where he graduated with a degree in economics, politics, and philosophy. Upon completion, he joined Harvard University for an MBA. He is the current president of Gap Inc. under the international division.

Before he joined Gap Inc., Andrew Rolfe was CEO and chairman of a London-based food retailer with operations in the UK, Tokyo, Hong Kong, and New York City. He is also the director of WH Smith Plc. At Gap Inc., he oversees the company’s operations in Japan, UK, Germany, and France.